CryptoArt Shrugged

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Description:

Imagine for a moment this scenario. The most amazing art the world may ever see has just been finished, and you're its proud creator. Anxious to release your work for sale as rare digital art, you head over to your favorite online art market to launch the artwork to the … (read more)

Imagine for a moment this scenario. The most amazing art the world may ever see has just been finished, and you're its proud creator. Anxious to release your work for sale as rare digital art, you head over to your favorite online art market to launch the artwork to the public... yet... something's wrong! The marketplace is supposed to be live but it's temporarily delayed. Or other unexpected technical difficulties--with your entire preferred blockchain--make it impossible to immediately release such precious art.

Would this now be the time to...
(a) Panic?
(b) Complain?
(c) Keep clicking buttons until your will be done?
(d) Leave this sketchy, experimental field forever?

The answer--probably--is actually (e), none of the above.

Therefore what should creators do when their preferred rare digital art gallery--in which they desperately want to release new artworks on--is having downtime or is delayed? The short answer is... something else. As with most things highly technical, new, and still evolving, proper development for mass consumption takes time and frequent revision. Rome was not built in a day.

Remember also some related facts of development.

(1) The Internet was quite fragmented at its inception. In fact, many sites only worked in certain browsers. Many computers did not even have a web browser. The first web browser was created in 1990, yet it took at least 8 years before the Web Standards Project started to push for the Internet to have clear standards for web browsers.

(2) While Bitcoin went live in 2009, it took another 6 years before anyone could issue rare digital art on top of Bitcoin (through Counterparty).

(3) With Ethereum launching in 2015, it was not until over 2 years later that anyone could issue rare digital art through Ethereum.

(4) Launched in 2018 as a faster blockchain with no transaction fees (unlike Bitcoin and Ethereum), major rare digital art markets on the EOS blockchain (such as pixEOS) will not go live until the later portion of 2019.

With these things in mind, the "urgent" feeling of disappointment or even frustration when delays bump through new technologies are--in most cases--not cause for alarm at all. It's all relative, and just a normal part of the development process. In other words, that's life; shrug it off.

Joe Chiappetta


Additional Details:
  • 2500 x 1667 px, PNG (3.8 MB)
  • This is a signed and limited edition digital creation.
    What does this mean?
  • You're purchasing the full non-commerical rights to this creation. Learn more.
  • All sales are final.
  • The creation will be transferred to your digital wallet. If you don't have one, we'll provide one for you.
  • You may download the full-sized creation to display or even print for personal use.

Comments

Very good reflection for artistic anxiety and wonderful creation that represents the internet world. A much needed vintage touch to understand that everything needs time.

REPLY
Mike Butler
2019/10/01

I love it! The cartoon is delightfully cheeky and the robot is such a great visualization of the trials and tribulations of glitchy, bleeding edge technology.

REPLY

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