Bandits Hut Iceberg

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Description:

It feels super cliche to write about moments that change the direction of your life. But (bare with me) for me this was one of those.

I'd been in Antarctica for about 11 months- almost a year since leaving Australia on the ship the Aurora Australis. I'd been stuck on … (read more)

It feels super cliche to write about moments that change the direction of your life. But (bare with me) for me this was one of those.

I'd been in Antarctica for about 11 months- almost a year since leaving Australia on the ship the Aurora Australis. I'd been stuck on station for about a month after breaking a rib- and I had cabin fever. Severely.

We'd jagged amazing weather for our field trip, and we were making the most of it from sunrise to sunset. It was cold, but clear. We'd spent the previous night at Platcha Hut, and spent the day climbing mountains, sliding on our bellies across slick frozen fresh water lakes, ice skating in ancient skates on anything that was flat enough, ice climbing, doing all the things, exploring all the places, taking all the photos.

We'd arrived late afternoon at my favourite field hut- Bandit's and set about unpacking the day- defrosting the olive oil infront of the gas heater (because that's a normal thing to do in Antarctica) so we could cook dinner and relax with a wine and a game of cards for the night. I'd just finished pulling off the hundreds of layers of clothing I was wearing when I saw it, out the window of the hut. The Antarctic Plateau was pink.

It was a rush to get the layers back on, new cards in cameras, batteries against the skin so the cold didn't sap the life out of them and rush back out into the cold.

The icebergs around Bandits Hut have become trapped over years. They move around a bit when the sea ice thaws in summer, but the island acts like a dam wall, not allowing them to escape out to sea. The result is like a labyrinth of icebergs, around each corner a whole new icescape. I could lose hours in this place.

As the sun dipped lower, the Antarctic Plateau lit up more with pinks and purples and hues that seemed to just soak everything in it's reach. The light just kept getting better. And this iceberg looked like it was glowing, the snow on it illuminated by the last rays of sun.

I didn't realise it at the time, but this iceberg is the reason I became a professional photographer. It was my first magazine cover, the first image published in a book, and the most successful photo from my year in Antarctica. It opened doors to work with magazines and other incredible photographers, to meet and work with some of the most interesting people I've ever met- and to expand my craft over years that followed. It reminds me to take those extra moments, put in that extra effort and look for that glorious light over your shoulder. I think every photographer has "that" photo. This is mine.


Additional Details:
  • 3861 x 2574 px, JPEG (4.0 MB)
  • This is a signed and limited edition digital creation.
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Comments

Such an amazing experience to see such a spectacular light event. The awe you and your companions must have felt. And so beautifully photographed. ♥︎♥︎⚖️♥︎♥︎

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Love this lanscape

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